Categories
Other Photography Videography

Cineflat: A Nikon Flat Picture Control for Videography

Brussels

A full guide on better DSLR video is coming soon on Photograph IO. Stay tuned.

Let’s face it : DSLR cameras (and mirrorless cameras now) are not only great tools for photography, but they can also be excellent rigs for video. With the advent of the Nikon D90 in 2008, being the first DSLR able to shoot HD video, more and more people have been starting to get into cinematography using interchangeable lens cameras. With their large sensors, DSLR’s allow you to get that cinematic, shallow depth of field while still retaining a great amount of control over the final result for quite an affordable price.

However, one major drawback of DSLR’s compared to dedicated motion cameras from Red, Arri or Blackmagic is in their mediocre, at best, output. While high end motion cameras costing tens of thousands of dollars can shoot in near-lossless, Apple Prores 442 or even RAW video, most DSLR’s are limited in their output quality by the highly compressed codecs used not to mention a lower bitrate. Some of these limitations are hardware based (i.e. overheating, processing power), while some others can be cured by software and firmware. Unless you have a D800 or 5D Mark III capable of clean HDMI output, chances are that your output video is compressed.

But there is a way of improving this.

Categories
Essays and Opinion News

A Customer Service Lesson Told

1280px-Nikon_D600

You may call this article an essay, an opinion, or a rant. I hesitated to post this on Photograph IO because this article is probably way too biased for the blog (sorry Nikon owners). Don’t say you haven’t been warned. ­čśŤ

Why do some companies flourish (Fuji) while others went bankrupt (Kodak)? How important is market share when it comes to brand equity and customer retention, if at all? These are all questions that I asked myself following the whole Nikon D600 scandal that was finally resolved recently.

When the Nikon D600 was initially released to the┬ápublic, tests done on the sensor of the camera model revealed that there was a dust/oil problem with the shutter and sensor. Despite many complaints from users, Nikon did nothing at all to help existing D600 owners, telling them instad to clean with a “rocket blower” and never acknowledged officially the problem. Instead, Nikon quietly released a newer model, the D610, a year only after the release of the D600 that magically fixed the problem and added a meager 0.5 FPS increase from 5.5 FPS to 6 FPS. Unusual? Indeed. Of course, they justified that the D610 was made because their customers wanted a “faster burst rate”. Sure, the D610 is an excellent camera on its own, but they way Nikon acted is very disrespectful of existing D600 owners. As one of world’s largest camera companies, this is utterly disappointing. The folks over at Nikon thought they could get away with the issue by covering it up and totally ignoring ethics and customer service. What a joke.

Categories
Infographics

Canon vs Nikon : The Rivalry (Infographic)

Canikon

Some of my friends and fellow photographers over at Flickr have asked me what is my take on the great Canon vs Nikon debate. Instead of writing a standard post, I thought it would be a great idea to share it under the form of an infographic. Although I currently use a Fuji X-Pro1 and a Nikon D5100 as my main bodies, I respect Canon just as much and have used their excellent gear in the past, and I (hopefully) have made the following infographic the most neutral and impartial possible, analyzing with facts and data.