Categories
Other Photography

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

One of the hottest debates in the world of photography, probably on par, it not even more debated than Canon vs Nikon, is the one between RAW and JPEG. The former is a lossless, direct output of the camera’s sensor data while the latter is a lossy compressed version of an already “cooked” photograph.

While most photographers recommend shooting RAW for any serious work due to its format retaining all information, there are tons of misinformation and preconceptions about this topic on the web. Instead of making a direct comparison in this article, I’ll let you judge by yourself the difference between RAW and JPEG using actual photographs.

Categories
Essays and Opinion Photography Street Photography

Thoughts on Street and Candid Photography

Street photography
Photo by Gitte Herden (Flickr)

One of the Fuji X Forum members, Gary Ayala, said this, “Everywhere you look there are photographs, it is the call of photographers to see and capture them.”

I completely agree with this statement as I am sure most of you will too. Yet, when it comes to street and candid photography, it seems that there are many different views about how to do this. I’ll explain more on that later.

Categories
Other Photography Videography

Cineflat: A Nikon Flat Picture Control for Videography

Brussels

A full guide on better DSLR video is coming soon on Photograph IO. Stay tuned.

Let’s face it : DSLR cameras (and mirrorless cameras now) are not only great tools for photography, but they can also be excellent rigs for video. With the advent of the Nikon D90 in 2008, being the first DSLR able to shoot HD video, more and more people have been starting to get into cinematography using interchangeable lens cameras. With their large sensors, DSLR’s allow you to get that cinematic, shallow depth of field while still retaining a great amount of control over the final result for quite an affordable price.

However, one major drawback of DSLR’s compared to dedicated motion cameras from Red, Arri or Blackmagic is in their mediocre, at best, output. While high end motion cameras costing tens of thousands of dollars can shoot in near-lossless, Apple Prores 442 or even RAW video, most DSLR’s are limited in their output quality by the highly compressed codecs used not to mention a lower bitrate. Some of these limitations are hardware based (i.e. overheating, processing power), while some others can be cured by software and firmware. Unless you have a D800 or 5D Mark III capable of clean HDMI output, chances are that your output video is compressed.

But there is a way of improving this.

Categories
Macro Photography Other Photography Photography Tips and Tricks

Photography Tips and Tricks #5: Use a Spray Bottle for Better Flower Shots

Dew Droplets

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

When it comes down to macro photography, dew drops can go a long way of enchanting a picture. In many cases, a picture will not even look half as good without dew drops that instinctively draw one’s eye on the subject. Are there photographers really raining after each rainstorm and/or waking up at 6 AM to get precious water droplets on their flower shots? While some surely do, most photographers don’t because there is a better technique for adding dew drops… a spray bottle.

Categories
Advanced Photography Techniques Essays and Opinion Other Photography

Should You Cover Your Viewfinder During Long Exposures?

Long exposure

You probably have an eyepiece cover that came with your DSLR when you purchased it… but are you actually using it? The answer is most likely no.

Should you use it? No. Not only is that eyepiece cover clumsy to take and remove, doing it too often has a change to loosen the eyepiece mount, making your regular eyepiece easier to fall off and lose accidentally.

However, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t cover your viewfinder at all. You can use a microfiber cloth, a cardboard or even by cupping your hands to cover the viewfinder in a pinch. While most cameras are well built enough in regards to light leaks, there are still some situations where covering your viewfinder might be a good idea. 

Categories
Lightroom Editing Series Other Photography

Turn ON This Simple Lightroom Setting and Avoid Headache Later

Montreal Clock Tower
SOOC Shot of Montreal’s clock tower.

Don’t get me wrong. Lightroom is a great program overall.

It combines photo editing and photo management into a single tool. It does non-destructive editing with RAW and Jpeg files, which means that the original file will always remain intact no matter the changes done to the final image. All of your develop edits are stored in Lightroom’s built-in database (aka catalog), just like every other tool you used, such as flags, collections, etc. But there is one problem with this type of centralized data storage. Your Lightroom catalog, just like any other database, will eventually fail.

Categories
Other Photography

Mesmerizing Multiple Exposures of Montreal’s Metro

12

The world of multiple exposures is a fascinating one to explore in photography. Indeed, combining two (or more) exposures in a single shot can give mesmerizing results that can seem to be out of this world, and this is the surely the case for these pictures of Montreal’s metro system. Rémi Martel is a French Canadian photographer and artist living in Montreal, and he is the one behind all these photographs. All of his shots were taken using a Nikon D7000 using the integrated multiple exposure mode with a 35mm f/1.8 DX G lens with minimal post-processing.

All images © Rémi Martel. Used with permission.

Categories
Photography Tips and Tricks

Photography Tips and Tricks #4 : Use Lightroom Camera Calibration for Better Blues

Calibration

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

There are many ways to enchance the sky in landscapes. Some people like to boost vibrance or saturation alltogether, while others like to underxpose highlights. Some people like to add GND filters, while others like to use HSL pane or even tone curves for better blues.

Categories
Lightroom Editing Series

How to Edit a Double Exposure Scene in Lightroom

Montreal Metro Multiple Exposure
The before/after result of this lightroom editing guide.

Images © Wei Xi Luo | Photograph IO. All rights reserved.

For more Lightroom editing workflows like this one, click here. View the different steps distraction-free using the lightbox by clicking on the images. 

In this second article on Lightroom editing, we’ll give a film look (without VSCO or any other presets) to a double exposure (an article on how to take multiple exposures is coming very soon) shot of people waiting in the Montreal Metro, Lionel-Groulx station textured with the picture of a wall. The first exposure of this image, the walls in the background, was shot at 1/30 sec @ f/4, ISO 800 while the second exposure, the people waiting on a bench, was shot at 1/15 sec @ f/4, ISO 800m both using a Fuji X-Pro1 with 18mm f/2 lens.

1) Distortion correction (or why the 18mm f/2 is soft in the corners)

Montreal Metro Double Exposure
Before distortion correction
Montreal Metro Double Exposure
After distortion correction

Although the Fuji X-Pro1 applies automatic distortion correction to its regular RAW files, multiple exposure RAW files produced by this camera doesn’t include that correction for whatever reason. This is something to keep in mind especially if you shoot with an *extremely* high distortion lens such as the 18mm f/2 XF R lens. No, I am not saying that this lens is bad, in fact, I would expect such a compact lens with fast aperture to have a high amount of distortion. But many people on the web wonder why this lens’ sharpness isn’t that good in corners, and that is because Fuji does automatically correct distortion to make it invisible, thus rendering corners soft.

But what happens when no distortion correction is applied? Well … an extremely pronounced barrel effect. Although I don’t know the exact distortion values to correct this lens, dialling + 20 (!!!) and constraining it to crop seemed to do the job. 

Categories
Essays and Opinion News

A Customer Service Lesson Told

1280px-Nikon_D600

You may call this article an essay, an opinion, or a rant. I hesitated to post this on Photograph IO because this article is probably way too biased for the blog (sorry Nikon owners). Don’t say you haven’t been warned. 😛

Why do some companies flourish (Fuji) while others went bankrupt (Kodak)? How important is market share when it comes to brand equity and customer retention, if at all? These are all questions that I asked myself following the whole Nikon D600 scandal that was finally resolved recently.

When the Nikon D600 was initially released to the public, tests done on the sensor of the camera model revealed that there was a dust/oil problem with the shutter and sensor. Despite many complaints from users, Nikon did nothing at all to help existing D600 owners, telling them instad to clean with a “rocket blower” and never acknowledged officially the problem. Instead, Nikon quietly released a newer model, the D610, a year only after the release of the D600 that magically fixed the problem and added a meager 0.5 FPS increase from 5.5 FPS to 6 FPS. Unusual? Indeed. Of course, they justified that the D610 was made because their customers wanted a “faster burst rate”. Sure, the D610 is an excellent camera on its own, but they way Nikon acted is very disrespectful of existing D600 owners. As one of world’s largest camera companies, this is utterly disappointing. The folks over at Nikon thought they could get away with the issue by covering it up and totally ignoring ethics and customer service. What a joke.