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Lightroom Editing Series Other Photography Photography Tips and Tricks

How to do a Single Picture HDR look in Adobe Lightroom

How to do a Single Picture HDR look in Adobe Lightroom

You transfer your pictures from your camera onto your computer. You take a look at them and some of them just don’t look the way you thought they would — underexposed, a little out of focus, dull… Fortunately, Lightroom is here for you.

Adobe Lightroom is a great tool to make, or rather fake, the HDR look using only one picture. Not only is it extremely simple to do, but it only requires fiddling with the basic sliders.

Let’s get started!

(I am assuming that you already know how to import pictures into Lightroom and get into the Develop module. See you there! A complete guide for Lightroom for beginners is coming soon… patience.)

First of all, I like to start with the Highlights and the Shadows. The sliders can be found under the Basic tab. For the HDR look, I bring down the Highlights slider to -100 and set the Shadows slider to +100. This will bring back details in the picture (and dynamic range). It might look washed out for now, but don’t worry, we will take care of that in just a second!

*Do not abuse this HDR technique. It may be a quick fix but nothing remedies crappy technique. Sincerely. *

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Essays and Opinion Interviews Other Photography Street Photography Travel Photography Urban Photography Videography

Ming Thein : Interview with the Master

Today’s interview features a special guest, a mentor and certainly one of the best photographers out there in today’s world : Ming Thein. Ming Thein has always been one of our influencers here at Photograph IO with his transparent but evocative style of photography. He’s also one of the main driving reasons that pushed us to start this blog. Let’s begin this interview 🙂

Ming Thein
Ming Thein

Photograph IO : Hi Ming!

Ming Thein : Hello!

Photograph IO : To begin this interview, can you please start by introducing yourself and what you do for our readers who may not know your blog?

Ming Thein : Hello there. Thank you for having me. I am a photographer first, a philosopher/writer second, a commercial photographer third, a teacher fourth and a blogger a distant fifth. My commercial work centers around product and corporate documentary. Much like hardware – the Internet is merely another tool for the former; I run www.mingthein.com which is perhaps one of the few photography sites that puts images and ‘the why’ first, and reviews second. In another life I was in consulting and private equity, but found the ethics questionable at best and the lack of concrete output extremely frustrating. So against better advice, I quit and here I am today. I photograph because I’m compelled to do so, and because I feel there’s something in being able to capture and present the transient, the uncommon, and the unseen in the mundane. Is it art? Who knows.

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Advanced Photography Techniques How-To's Other Photography

How to Shoot Levitation Photography

diana-levitation-macbook

Check out all of our other how-to guides here.

In this tutorial we will learn how to make some compelling levitation shots, with two different methods. Plain simple. That’s it 🙂

Introduction

I think that creating a surreal portrait exemplifies the creative process. The entire experience, from planning to set up to shooting to processing, is a slow and methodical creative endeavor. When you have the intention of creating something surreal, all the constraints and bounds on your creativity are loosened. With such loose constraints, you are limited only by your imagination and your results will directly reflect the your creative efforts. Think of levitation as one of many elements of your photo. There are still a lot of other things to think about other than just the levitation part: your subject’s pose, the setting, the light, makeup, clothing, props, and all the other technical elements of the shot. Think about what unique ideas you can bring to your levitation photography project.

This post originally appeared over at The Photon Collective. We are republishing here, with permission, because there is some truly great content in it.

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Other Photography Tips and Tricks Urban Photography

Photography Tips and Tricks #7 : Use a Flash for Snow Photography

Snow with flash
Snow with flash

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

Photography in the wintertime is, and always is, a tricky challenge. Not only do you have to brave the cold weather (with your fogged lenses too), deal with shorter batteries (since they don’t last as long in the cold), but falling snow is also a major part of the equation. Yes, snow can ruin your camera and equipment, but it can also yield beautiful images. That is, with this ONE simple trick. Use a flash for snow photography.

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News Other Photography

Photograph IO : Plans for 2015

Prague
The train has departed, prague

With 2014 being over for all of us all around the planet, it is now time for 2015 to come in all its force!

First things first. We’d first like to thank all of our loyal readers for your continued support throughout the creation of the blog in July 2014 all the way up to now. A lot of great things are announced for 2015. Stay tuned!

As Photograph IO’s editor-in-chief, I’m also giving you guys a gift, a sneak peek in my work : although many of you have seen my landscape work over at 500px (as well as an excellent guide to get popular on that platform) and Flickr (a guide coming soon?), I finally decided to publish many of my urban/street work in a large portfolio which can be accessed here; hope you guys enjoy!

On the blog side, we’ve also striving to stick to a few resolutions, if you mind to call them as such 😛 Here we go:

To sum up, more content is on the way. Hell yeah.

For those of you who hasn’t seen our list of Photograph IO 2014 Articles, there is some serious stuff coming to the blog, as well as smaller, regular posts to keep you readers occupied!

1) Reviews are definitely coming to the blog. Now that I’ve owned every single photography factor, ranging from small format (phones), APS-C, Full-Frame and Medium Format, I definitely feel comfortable making some reviews about the gear I use.

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News Other Photography

Fujifilm X100T Annoucement : A Roundup of Features

Fujifilm X100T

With the release of the X100, the company’s first flagship compact, about three years ago, Fujifilm established its turnover from a dying film company to a reputation of making high-quality photography equipment with photographers in mind. After the release of the X100S that corrected many of the initial X100S quirks nearly two years ago, Fuji is back in the market with a new model, the X100T, better than ever before.

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Other Photography

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

RAW vs JPEG: A Visual Comparison Using Real-World Examples

One of the hottest debates in the world of photography, probably on par, it not even more debated than Canon vs Nikon, is the one between RAW and JPEG. The former is a lossless, direct output of the camera’s sensor data while the latter is a lossy compressed version of an already “cooked” photograph.

While most photographers recommend shooting RAW for any serious work due to its format retaining all information, there are tons of misinformation and preconceptions about this topic on the web. Instead of making a direct comparison in this article, I’ll let you judge by yourself the difference between RAW and JPEG using actual photographs.

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Other Photography Videography

Cineflat: A Nikon Flat Picture Control for Videography

Brussels

A full guide on better DSLR video is coming soon on Photograph IO. Stay tuned.

Let’s face it : DSLR cameras (and mirrorless cameras now) are not only great tools for photography, but they can also be excellent rigs for video. With the advent of the Nikon D90 in 2008, being the first DSLR able to shoot HD video, more and more people have been starting to get into cinematography using interchangeable lens cameras. With their large sensors, DSLR’s allow you to get that cinematic, shallow depth of field while still retaining a great amount of control over the final result for quite an affordable price.

However, one major drawback of DSLR’s compared to dedicated motion cameras from Red, Arri or Blackmagic is in their mediocre, at best, output. While high end motion cameras costing tens of thousands of dollars can shoot in near-lossless, Apple Prores 442 or even RAW video, most DSLR’s are limited in their output quality by the highly compressed codecs used not to mention a lower bitrate. Some of these limitations are hardware based (i.e. overheating, processing power), while some others can be cured by software and firmware. Unless you have a D800 or 5D Mark III capable of clean HDMI output, chances are that your output video is compressed.

But there is a way of improving this.

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Macro Photography Other Photography Photography Tips and Tricks

Photography Tips and Tricks #5: Use a Spray Bottle for Better Flower Shots

Dew Droplets

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

When it comes down to macro photography, dew drops can go a long way of enchanting a picture. In many cases, a picture will not even look half as good without dew drops that instinctively draw one’s eye on the subject. Are there photographers really raining after each rainstorm and/or waking up at 6 AM to get precious water droplets on their flower shots? While some surely do, most photographers don’t because there is a better technique for adding dew drops… a spray bottle.

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Advanced Photography Techniques Essays and Opinion Other Photography

Should You Cover Your Viewfinder During Long Exposures?

Long exposure

You probably have an eyepiece cover that came with your DSLR when you purchased it… but are you actually using it? The answer is most likely no.

Should you use it? No. Not only is that eyepiece cover clumsy to take and remove, doing it too often has a change to loosen the eyepiece mount, making your regular eyepiece easier to fall off and lose accidentally.

However, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t cover your viewfinder at all. You can use a microfiber cloth, a cardboard or even by cupping your hands to cover the viewfinder in a pinch. While most cameras are well built enough in regards to light leaks, there are still some situations where covering your viewfinder might be a good idea.