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Interviews Photography Street Photography Urban Photography

Interview with Marco Larousse, Street and Fine Art Photographer

MarcoLarousse Portrait

Today’s interview is going to focus with a quite famous photographer in the blogosphere, Marco Larousse, a street, fine art and documentary photographer as well as an official Fujifilm X-Photographer based in Hamburg, Germany. Some of you may know him for his Fuji X Files blog. The interview itself is going to focus on street photography in particular, but also on general technique and advice. Enjoy!

All photographs © Marco Larousse. Used kindly with permission.


Photograph IO : Hi Marco, could you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?

Marco Larousse : I’m a fine art street and documentary photographer based in Hamburg, Germany.  I’m also one of the official Fujifilm X-Photographers and I am working both in digital and analog. And most of my work is in black and white.

Photograph IO : And how long have been into photography?

Marco Larousse : I’ve started photography around the late 70’s, so I guess around 35 years.

Photograph IO : How would you describe your photography style?

Marco Larousse : As as street photographer, I love to find symmetry in street photography scenes where people are going after their daily routine in an interesting architecture and or light and shadow scene. My focus is on the scene while keeping the person anonymous. This way the viewer of the image can make up his own story about the scene and what the person may be doing and what emotional mood he/she may be in.

Categories
Lightroom Editing Series Other Photography Photography Tips and Tricks

How to do a Single Picture HDR look in Adobe Lightroom

How to do a Single Picture HDR look in Adobe Lightroom

You transfer your pictures from your camera onto your computer. You take a look at them and some of them just don’t look the way you thought they would — underexposed, a little out of focus, dull… Fortunately, Lightroom is here for you.

Adobe Lightroom is a great tool to make, or rather fake, the HDR look using only one picture. Not only is it extremely simple to do, but it only requires fiddling with the basic sliders.

Let’s get started!

(I am assuming that you already know how to import pictures into Lightroom and get into the Develop module. See you there! A complete guide for Lightroom for beginners is coming soon… patience.)

First of all, I like to start with the Highlights and the Shadows. The sliders can be found under the Basic tab. For the HDR look, I bring down the Highlights slider to -100 and set the Shadows slider to +100. This will bring back details in the picture (and dynamic range). It might look washed out for now, but don’t worry, we will take care of that in just a second!

*Do not abuse this HDR technique. It may be a quick fix but nothing remedies crappy technique. Sincerely. *

Categories
Essays and Opinion Interviews Other Photography Street Photography Travel Photography Urban Photography Videography

Ming Thein : Interview with the Master

Today’s interview features a special guest, a mentor and certainly one of the best photographers out there in today’s world : Ming Thein. Ming Thein has always been one of our influencers here at Photograph IO with his transparent but evocative style of photography. He’s also one of the main driving reasons that pushed us to start this blog. Let’s begin this interview 🙂

Ming Thein
Ming Thein

Photograph IO : Hi Ming!

Ming Thein : Hello!

Photograph IO : To begin this interview, can you please start by introducing yourself and what you do for our readers who may not know your blog?

Ming Thein : Hello there. Thank you for having me. I am a photographer first, a philosopher/writer second, a commercial photographer third, a teacher fourth and a blogger a distant fifth. My commercial work centers around product and corporate documentary. Much like hardware – the Internet is merely another tool for the former; I run www.mingthein.com which is perhaps one of the few photography sites that puts images and ‘the why’ first, and reviews second. In another life I was in consulting and private equity, but found the ethics questionable at best and the lack of concrete output extremely frustrating. So against better advice, I quit and here I am today. I photograph because I’m compelled to do so, and because I feel there’s something in being able to capture and present the transient, the uncommon, and the unseen in the mundane. Is it art? Who knows.

Categories
Advanced Photography Techniques How-To's Other Photography

How to Shoot Levitation Photography

diana-levitation-macbook

Check out all of our other how-to guides here.

In this tutorial we will learn how to make some compelling levitation shots, with two different methods. Plain simple. That’s it 🙂

Introduction

I think that creating a surreal portrait exemplifies the creative process. The entire experience, from planning to set up to shooting to processing, is a slow and methodical creative endeavor. When you have the intention of creating something surreal, all the constraints and bounds on your creativity are loosened. With such loose constraints, you are limited only by your imagination and your results will directly reflect the your creative efforts. Think of levitation as one of many elements of your photo. There are still a lot of other things to think about other than just the levitation part: your subject’s pose, the setting, the light, makeup, clothing, props, and all the other technical elements of the shot. Think about what unique ideas you can bring to your levitation photography project.

This post originally appeared over at The Photon Collective. We are republishing here, with permission, because there is some truly great content in it.

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How-To's Landscape Photography Photography

10 Simple Tips to Improve your Landscape Photography

Landscape Photography

Check out all of our other how-to guides here.

Every and each photographer has probably done landscape photography at least once in their careers as amateurs or pros. Landscape photography is simple one of those pictures that everyone raves about with all the bright colours and amazing scenery that makes eyeballs drop. No wonder it is by far the most popular category on 500px!

If you want to learn how to make amazing landscape shots but don’t know where to start, this guide is for you. 


10 Landscape photography tips

Although I no longer shoot as much landscape as I used to, many of my best shots were landscape photos and the technique, and rigour required for shooting landscape has certainly translated well into other fields of photography as well.

One aspect that can set your landscape photography apart is thinking about the the background, as well as the foreground. This way, you will give those viewing your picture a way into it and create a depth in your image. I have put together a few tips on clicking the perfect shot, ones that I learnt when I was a lot more  into landscape photography.

Without waiting, here are ten landscape photography tips to get you started.

1. Light is Everything

Although a landscape or particular scenery may seem static, it really isn’t. Light, just like exposure, can significantly affect the composition of your shot by shifting weight towards certain elements over others. 

Categories
Lightroom Editing Series Photography Street Photography Urban Photography

How to Make a Bad Picture Look Good in Adobe Lightroom

Final Image

Images © Jack (Wei Xi) Luo | Photograph IO. All rights reserved.

For more Lightroom editing workflows like this one, click here. Disclaimer/warming : you can’t actually turn a 100% crappy shot into an 100% amazing one. While Lightroom and digital darkroom these days can overcome most technical shortcomings with relative ease; talk about noise reduction, tonal editing to modify the sensor feel, or even shake reduction as of Photoshop CC, NOTHING will fix bad composition and plain simple laziness. Sorry. 

What happens when you take a bad (ok, ordinary) point and shoot picture and try to make it into something good?

In this fourth of the Lightroom Editing Series, we’ll turn an bad (ordinary?) picture of a Chinese highway (it’s in Shenyang if I recall correctly) taken using a 2008 compact, the Sony DSC-H50, into a great looking shot using modern Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. And it’s a video this time 🙂

Categories
Interviews Photography Portrait Photography

Interview with Eric Dye, Semi-Pro Portrait Photographer

Eric Dye

Today we are doing a different formula from the usual blog posts we are doing here at Photograph IO. Following numerous reader requests, we have decided to conduct interviews with fellow photographers 🙂 Eric Dye, a semi-pro portrait photographer, is going to give some solid, concrete advice for beginners wishing to improve their photography, specifically portrait photography!

All photographs © Eric Dye. Used kindly with permission.


Photograph IO : Hello, Eric! Glad to be with you.

Eric Dye : Greetings! Glad to be with you too!

Photograph IO : To begin, can you introduce yourself a little bit?

Eric Dye : I’m a student at Penn State Behrend where I study journalism and communications. I’ve been shooting for about eight years now on the side doing everything from senior portraits and concerts to weddings. I’m the Creative Director and Opinion Editor for The Behrend Beacon, my school’s newspaper. There I do everything from designing ads and page layouts to teaching new writers basic photography techniques.

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Other Photography Tips and Tricks Urban Photography

Photography Tips and Tricks #7 : Use a Flash for Snow Photography

Snow with flash
Snow with flash

For more quick photography tips and tricks like this one, click here.

Photography in the wintertime is, and always is, a tricky challenge. Not only do you have to brave the cold weather (with your fogged lenses too), deal with shorter batteries (since they don’t last as long in the cold), but falling snow is also a major part of the equation. Yes, snow can ruin your camera and equipment, but it can also yield beautiful images. That is, with this ONE simple trick. Use a flash for snow photography.

Categories
Lightroom Editing Series Photography

How to Edit a Cinematic Scene in Lightroom

Before/After
Before/After

Images © Wei Xi Luo | Photograph IO. All rights reserved.

For more Lightroom editing workflows like this one, click here. View the different steps distraction-free using the lightbox by clicking on the images. 

Did it ever happen to you that you took a shot in camera but visualized something totally different with your eye? Have you ever wondered how to turn a seemingly ‘ordinary’ image into a cinematic scene?

In this third article of the Lightroom Editing Series, we’ll turn a mundane scene of a New York yellow taxi into a cinematic-style piece of art. The picture itself was shot using a Fuji X-Pro1, 35mm f/1.4 lens at 1/125 sec @ f/1.4, ISO 400.

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News Other Photography

Photograph IO : Plans for 2015

Prague
The train has departed, prague

With 2014 being over for all of us all around the planet, it is now time for 2015 to come in all its force!

First things first. We’d first like to thank all of our loyal readers for your continued support throughout the creation of the blog in July 2014 all the way up to now. A lot of great things are announced for 2015. Stay tuned!

As Photograph IO’s editor-in-chief, I’m also giving you guys a gift, a sneak peek in my work : although many of you have seen my landscape work over at 500px (as well as an excellent guide to get popular on that platform) and Flickr (a guide coming soon?), I finally decided to publish many of my urban/street work in a large portfolio which can be accessed here; hope you guys enjoy!

On the blog side, we’ve also striving to stick to a few resolutions, if you mind to call them as such 😛 Here we go:

To sum up, more content is on the way. Hell yeah.

For those of you who hasn’t seen our list of Photograph IO 2014 Articles, there is some serious stuff coming to the blog, as well as smaller, regular posts to keep you readers occupied!

1) Reviews are definitely coming to the blog. Now that I’ve owned every single photography factor, ranging from small format (phones), APS-C, Full-Frame and Medium Format, I definitely feel comfortable making some reviews about the gear I use.